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Dr. Remington Nevin

Dr. Remington Nevin is a Vermont-based physician epidemiologist and expert consultant in the adverse effects of antimalarial drugs, including mefloquine (marketed as Lariam®), tafenoquine (marketed as Krintafel®, Kodatef®, and Arakoda™), chloroquine, and hydroxychloroquine. Dr. Nevin is board certified in Occupational Medicine and Public Health and General Preventive Medicine by the American Board of Preventive Medicine and Certified in Public Health by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. A former U.S. Army Major and Preventive Medicine Officer, Dr. Nevin serves as Executive Director of the Vermont-based Quinism Foundation, and is an adjunct lecturer in public health at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

Dr. Nevin’s work has been instrumental in improving policymakers’ understanding of the potential for long-lasting and permanent neurologic and psychiatric effects from quinoline antimalarials, as exemplified by the FDA  "black box" warning for mefloquine. Dr. Nevin has testified before the U.S. Senate, the Australian Senate, the U.K. Parliament, and the Canadian Parliament, and has provided evidence to the Irish Department of Defence on the drug’s lasting neurologic and psychiatric adverse effects confounding the diagnosis and management of posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. Dr. Nevin's work has contributed directly to militaries in the U.S., Canada, the U.K., and Ireland discontinuing their decades-long policies of first-line use of mefloquine, in favor of safer and better-tolerated alternatives. Dr. Nevin has also advocated for improvements to Peace Corps mefloquine policy to better protect the health of civilian volunteers at risk of exposure to the drug.


Dr. Nevin was first to publish a clinical description of quinism, the permanent disorder of brain and brainstem dysfunction caused by the use of mefloquine and related quinoline drugs, and to publish descriptions of certain of its features, including limbic encephalopathy and neurotoxic vestibulopathy. Dr. Nevin has also collaborated on the first review of mefloquine’s adverse effects published in the forensic psychiatry literature, and published the first case report of a U.S. military veteran awarded service-related disability compensation for long-lasting adverse psychiatric effects from the drug.


Dr. Nevin is available for plaintiff and defense medicolegal consultation and has successfully aided attorney clients in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the European Union in reaching favorable settlements in cases involving claims of central nervous system injury and other adverse effects from antimalarial drugs. Dr. Nevin is also pleased to offer his services in preparing nexus letters and independent medical opinion reports for veterans seeking disability compensation for injuries and illnesses arising from antimalarial exposure during military service.


You can learn more about Dr. Nevin's services, or contact Dr. Nevin for more information.